Big Blokes Polo- to 200 cm Chest

$75.00

Big Blokes Polo – Up to 200 cm Chest in the best range of colours -very lightweight and ready to wear just about anywhere – Check the size Chart

Clear

Description

Big Blokes Polo

Big Blokes Polo – This one is made for the Big Blokes – but smaller sizes are available

Up to 200 cm Chest in the best range of colours you’ve ever seen Quality, Value and a very generous fit –
Very lightweight and ready to wear just about anywhere

An enduring favourite, our comfortable classic polo is anything but ordinary.

With superior wrinkle and shrink resistance, a silky soft hand and an incredible range of styles, sizes and colours, it’s a first-rate choice for uniforming just about any group.

  • 140 GSM , 65/35 poly/cotton pique
  • Flat knit collar and cuffs
  • Metal buttons with dyed-to-match plastic rims
  • Double-needle armhole seams and hem
  • Side vents

Big Blokes Long Sleeve Shirts have a great range of colours too 

Check our $20 Polo for a Quality Budget choice 

*******Please allow 7-10 days for despatch on this item – Worth the wait though Mate! *******

Sizing for Big Blokes Polos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colours Available for Big Blokes Polo

Banana, Black, Bright Lavender, Burgundy, Clover, Coffee, Cool Grey, Court Green, Dark Green, Deep Berry, Eggplant, Hibiscus, Kelly, Light Blue, Light Pink, Light Stone, Lime, Maroon, Maui, Mediterranean, Mint, Navy, Orange, Purple, Red, Steel Grey, Strong Blue, Sunflower, Teal, Tropical Pink, Turquoise, Ultramarine

 

Wikipedia says about Colour

Color preference and associations between color and mood

Color has long been used to create feelings of coziness or spaciousness. However, how people are affected by different color stimuli varies from person to person.

Blue is the top choice for 35% of Americans, followed by green (16%), purple (10%) and red (9%).[10]

A preference for blue and green may be due to a preference for certain habitats that were beneficial in the ancestral environment as explained in the evolutionary aesthetics article.[11]

There is evidence that color preference may depend on ambient temperature. People who are cold prefer warm colors like red and yellow while people who are hot prefer cool colors like blue and green.[12]

Some research has concluded that women and men respectively prefer “warm” and “cool” colors.[12]

A few studies have shown that cultural background has a strong influence on color preference. These studies have shown that people from the same region regardless of race will have the same color preferences. Also, one region may have different preferences than another region (i.e., a different country or a different area of the same country), regardless of race.[12]

Children’s preferences for colors they find to be pleasant and comforting can be changed and can vary, while adult color preference is usually non-malleable.[12]

Some studies find that color can affect mood. However, these studies do not agree on precisely which moods are brought out by which colors.[12]

A study by psychologist Andrew J. Elliot tested to see if the color of a person’s clothing could make them appear more sexually appealing. He found that, to heterosexual men, women dressed in the color red were significantly more likely to attract romantic attention than women in any other color. The color did not affect heterosexual women’s assessment of other women’s attractiveness. Other studies have shown a preference for men dressed in red among heterosexual women.[2]

Common associations connecting a color to a particular mood may differ cross-culturally. For instance, one study examined color associations and moods using participants from Germany, Mexico, Poland, Russia, and the United States. The researchers did find some consistencies, including the fact that all nations associated red and black with anger. However, only Poles associated purple with both anger and jealousy and only Germans associated jealousy with yellow.[13] These differences highlight how culture influences peoples’ perceptions of color and color’s relationship to mood.

Despite cross-cultural differences regarding the ‘meanings’ of different colors, one study revealed that there were cross-cultural similarities regarding which emotional states people associated with particular colors: for example, the color red was perceived as strong and active.[14]

 

Additional information

Colour

Banana, Black, Bright Lavender, Burgundy, Clover, Coffee, Cool Grey, Court Green, Dark Green, Deep Berry, Eggplant, Hibiscus, Kelly, Light Blue, Light Pink, Light Stone, Lime, Maroon, Maui, Meditterranean, Mint, Navy, Orange, Purple, Red, Steel Grey, Strong Blue, Sunflower, Teal, Tropical Pink, Turquoise, Ultramarine, White

Size

US-XS, US-S, US-M, US-L, US-XL, US-2XL, US-3XL, US-4XL, US-5XL, US-6XL, US-7XL, US-8XL, US-9XL, US-10XL

You may also like…